Kumquat Marmalade

Kumquat Marmalade

Ingredients

1 1/2 lb. kumquats
1 naval orange
5 cups water
2 cups sugar
Pinch of sea salt

Special equipment: candy thermometer

Steps

Slice kumquats and an orange crosswise into rounds, picking out and reserving seeds*. Place fruit slices and their juices in a non-reactive saucepan. On a cheesecloth, add reserved seeds to make a bundle, then add the bundle to the saucepan. Add water. Bring the mixture to a boil, remove from heat, cover, and let sit for at least 4 hours or overnight. Add sugar to the mixture and cook over medium heat for 30-45 minutes. Remove the seed bundle and carefully press the bundle to extra juices. Add the juices back into the mixture. Continue to cook until the mixture reach a jelling point of 220 degrees F, or until desired thickness. Remove from heat. Skim off any scum or foam. Stir in sea salt. Pour into clean jars and store refrigerated for up to 2 weeks.

For shelf-stable jam, follow canning manufacturer’s guidelines and instructions.

*There is a lot of pectin in the seeds that will help the marmalade “gels.” If you don’t want to take this extra step, go ahead and discard the seeds.

Too much work? Try the quick, small-batch kumquat marmalade recipe!

Quick & Easy Kumquat Marmalade

Quick & Easy Kumquat Marmalade

Ingredients

About 1 1/2 lbs. kumquats
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup water
A pinch of sea salt

Steps

Cut the kumquats crosswise and remove seeds, then roughly chop. Measure out 2 cups of chopped fruit and place in a non-reactive saucepan and gently mix in sugar. Let sit for at least 15 minutes.  Add water, cover, and heat over medium heat for 5 minutes, or until the skins are turning translucent. Remove lid, and simmer over medium low for 15-20 minutes, or until thickened into syrup. Remove from heat and stir in a pinch of sea salt. Pour into a clean jar and store refrigerated for up to 2 weeks.

This small batch marmalade is not enough for you? Check out our big batch, shelf stable kumquat marmalade recipe.

Purple Sweet Potato Hummus

Purple Sweet Potato Hummus

This vibrant hummus has all the flavors of traditional hummus but without the beans. Serve with pita chips or fresh vegetables as a dip, or use as a spread on your next sandwich.   

Ingredients

1 1/2 lbs. Stokes Purple® sweet potato (one large, or about 2 smaller size), washed
3-4 garlic cloves, unpeeled
1/4 cup tahini
Juice of one lemon (about 2 tablespoons)
1/4 teaspoon ground cumin (plus more for garnish)
Salt, to taste
Extra virgin olive oil, for drizzle

Steps

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Wrap purple sweet potato and garlic cloves together in aluminum foil, and bake for 1 hour to 1 hour and 15 minutes, until the potato is soft and the garlic is fragrant.  Let cool in the wrapping for at least one hour before using (or refrigerate overnight).  Peel, cube, and mash purple sweet potato. This will yield about 2 1/2 to 3 cups of mash. Add mashed sweet potato to the food processor.  Peel roasted garlic and add to the potato. Process until smooth.  Add tahini, lemon juice, cumin and season to taste. Process until well combined. Serve at room temperature with a drizzle of olive oil.

The Future Is Purple: Pantone Picks ‘Ultra Violet’ as 2018 Color of the Year

Bring the Color of the Year into supermarkets with vibrant purple produce

Los Alamitos, CA (December 2017) – Purple still reigns, according to Pantone, the global authority on color, announcing “Ultra Violet” as the 2018 Color of the Year. Pantone’s selection comes on the heels of a report by Frieda’s Specialty Produce naming colorful produce (including purple) a 2018 food trend.

Each year, Pantone chooses a color that symbolizes design trends and the cultural mood. “Inventive and imaginative, Ultra Violet lights the way to what is yet to come,” according to Pantone’s website.

“The description of Ultra Violet hits home with us because purple has been our color from the very beginning,” said Alex Jackson Berkley of Frieda’s. “My grandmother, Frieda Rapoport Caplan, opened the business with a purple sign in 1962. She was the first woman to own a produce business and purple became a symbolic color for the company’s passion and innovation.”

Since 2012, when Frieda’s launched their “Power of Purple” program, they have been helping customers create exciting in-store experiences around this popular color.

“The popularity of purple produce shows no sign of slowing as more shoppers are discovering the nutritional values of purple produce and the photo-friendly color it adds to their plates,” said Berkley. “With Pantone’s latest news, we are already creating some new promotions and programs to increase the customer experience in store. Stay tuned for our announcements in the near future.”

As the purple produce experts, Frieda’s team is at the ready to help produce merchandisers bring #PurplePowerToThePeople by creating bountiful purple displays showcasing purple cauliflower, asparagus, baby potatoes, kohlrabi, and baby carrots, along with passion fruit, eggplant, radicchio, Treviso, and shoppers’ favorite Stokes Purple® sweet potatoes.

Frieda's Specialty Produce - Purple Power - Retail Display

About Frieda’s Inc.

Frieda’s Specialty Produce has been inspiring new food experiences for friends, families, and food lovers everywhere since 1962. From kiwifruit to dragon fruit and from Stokes Purple® sweet potatoes to habanero peppers, Frieda’s has introduced more than 200 unique fruits and vegetables to the U.S. marketplace. Founded by produce industry trailblazer Dr. Frieda Rapoport Caplan, subject of the 2015 documentary “Fear No Fruit,” the family company is owned and operated by Frieda’s daughters, Karen Caplan and Jackie Caplan Wiggins, in Orange County, California. Find Frieda’s on Facebook, @FriedasProduce, and Friedas.com. Inspire. Taste. Love.